Applied Science and Biotechnology Journal for Advanced Research https://abjar.vandanapublications.com/index.php/ojs <p><strong style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: bolder; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.87); font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: justify; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration-thickness: initial; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;">Online ISSN : </strong><a href="https://portal.issn.org/resource/ISSN/2583-553X" target="_blank" rel="noopener">2583-553X</a><strong style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: bolder; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.87); font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: justify; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration-thickness: initial; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;"><br /></strong></p> <p><strong style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: bolder; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.87); font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: justify; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration-thickness: initial; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;">DOI Prefix : </strong>10.31033/abjar<strong style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: bolder; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.87); font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: justify; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration-thickness: initial; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;"><br /></strong></p> <p><strong style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: bolder; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.87); font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: justify; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration-thickness: initial; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;">Frequency : </strong>Bimonthly</p> <p>Applied Science and Biotechnology Journal for Advanced Research is an Peer-Reviewed &amp; Refereed open access bimonthly international journal publishing original research papers / articles from all the fields of applied science and biotechnology subjects. Authors are encouraged to submit complete unpublished and original works, which are not under review in any other journals. The scopes of the journal include, but limited to the following topic areas: Biology, Life Science, Anatomy, Botany, Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Computer Science, Cytology, Genetics, Clinical Microbiology, Microbiology, Physiology, Zoology, Ecology, Environmental Science, Hydrobiology, Neurobiology, Developmental Biology, Immunology, Information Technology, Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Biotechnology, Genomics, and Proteomics.</p> <p>To know more about the journal, <a href="https://abjar.vandanapublications.com/index.php/ojs/about"><strong>Click here</strong><strong>...</strong></a></p> Vandana Publications en-US Applied Science and Biotechnology Journal for Advanced Research 2583-553X Analysis Protein Drugs Design Program with Quality and Structure Prediction https://abjar.vandanapublications.com/index.php/ojs/article/view/24 <p>A complete lack of hair will result when the "hairless protein" associated with the hairless gene, which is required for hair growth, ceases to function. The coordinates of this gene are 22027873-22045326 on chromosome 8. The JmjC domain superfamily includes the hairless gene, which also contributes to the process of histone demethylation. The domain sequence is 212 amino acids long and spans residue positions 946 to 1157 in the hairless protein, which has 1189 residues. JmjC domains have been discovered in more than 100 eukaryotic and bacterial sequences based on considerable sequence similarity, including the human hairless gene, which is mutated in people with alopecia universalis. To homology model the JmjC domain in the hairless protein, we have tried the bioinformatics method. NCBI-BLASTP, EBIClustalW, SMART, 3D-PSSM, DeepView/Swiss-PDB Viewer, PyMOL, and WhatCheck are the tools and programs utilized in this work. Using the template crystal structure of the likely antibiotic production protein from Thermus thermophilus HB8, the structure of the JmjC domain is predicted. Modeled domain structure's minimized energy value was -3394.570 KJ/mol. The simulated domain structure was validated using the WHAT IF-Proteins Model Check tool.</p> Eastman, P. Teicholz, C. Copyright (c) 2023 Eastman, P., Teicholz, C. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2023-03-31 2023-03-31 2 2 1 5 10.31033/abjar.2.2.1 Mathematical Machine Readable Authentication Protocols for Network Security https://abjar.vandanapublications.com/index.php/ojs/article/view/25 <p>Since the International Civil Aviation Organization created standards that allow passports to store biometric identification, electronic passports have been widely and quickly embraced throughout the world. The use of biometrics for identification has the potential to improve people's quality of life and make the world a safer place to live in. By more precisely identifying a person, biometric passports are meant to stop travelers from entering a nation illegally and to reduce the use of fake documents. This article examines the biometric e-passport design for the face, fingerprint, palmprint, and iris. This article focuses on the personal security and privacy of e-passport holders, as well as the actual security benefits that governments have gained from the use of face, fingerprint, palmprint, and iris recognition technology in e-passports. Researchers looked at the facial fingerprint, palmprint, and iris biometrics now utilized with e-passports as well as the key cryptographic elements and supporting procedures. The report also offers a security evaluation of the e-passport's use of face fingerprint, palmprint, and iris biometrics, which are meant to increase security by safeguarding the ePassport holder's biometric data.</p> R.M.L.S. Chandrarathna Copyright (c) 2023 R.M.L.S. Chandrarathna https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2023-03-31 2023-03-31 2 2 6 12 10.31033/abjar.2.2.2 Effect of Crude Engine Oil and Aromatic Fractions of Pleurotus Pulmonarius Fries (Quelet) https://abjar.vandanapublications.com/index.php/ojs/article/view/26 <p>The ability of two white rot fungi, Pleurotus ostreatus and P. pulmonarius, to degrade crude and used engine oil was examined for six months. In 9 9 4 cm (350 cm3) jam bottles, 100 grams of sterilized soil were weighed and wet with 75% distilled water (w/v). They were then completely mixed with bonny light crude oil and used motor oil at various concentrations (0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 25%, and 30%), individually. Then, using a sterile cork borer, two agar plugs of a strongly growing P. ostreatus and P. pulmonarius mycelium were inoculated into each bottle. For six months, the bottles were kept at room temperature. After drying, the mycelia-ramified waste was removed from the soil and examined for physicochemical characteristics such total hydrocarbon content (THC), organic matter, carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. After six months, both contaminated and inoculated soils had higher levels of organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus. However, during the experiment period, these soils had a drop in THC, pH, and potassium. In soils contaminated with 20% of crude and engine oils, respectively, P. ostreatus lowered the initial THC to 8% and 9%, which was less than P. pulmonarius. The two white rot fungus may be used in the bioremediation of soils contaminated with old motor oil and bonny light crude.</p> I.O. Adenipekun C.O. Fasidi Copyright (c) 2023 I.O. Adenipekun, C.O. Fasidi https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2023-04-16 2023-04-16 2 2 13 17 10.31033/abjar.2.2.3 Transcription Protease Synthase Discovered by Strain Solibacillus Sylvestris https://abjar.vandanapublications.com/index.php/ojs/article/view/27 <p>The goal of this work is to maximise the synthesis of bacterial alkaline protease from a mangrove isolate, Solibacillus silvestris, which has the capacity to create valuable primary and secondary metabolites of biotechnological value. Methodology: Using MALDI-TOF (mass spectrometry), the bacterium (known as Madhwad 103 Summer Zobell) used in the current study was isolated from soil that was obtained from Madhwad, Gir, India, during the summer. It was subsequently examined, utilising various physical and chemical variables, since it exhibited the greatest alkaline protease enzyme activity of the isolates. Selected parameters, i.e., Response Surface Methodology (RSM), were also applied to the optimisation of sucrose, peptone, and salinity. Results: Solibacillus silvestris was identified as the bacterium, which was given the name Madhwad 10-3 Summer Zobell. The results showed that the highest enzyme production can be achieved at pH 8.5, 40 °C of temperature, 48 hours of incubation, and an agitation speed of 120 rpm, while the highest enzyme activity was found to be given by sucrose and peptone with 0% salinity, with values of 221.7 U/ml and 246.7 U/ml, respectively. All the factors were significant in the statistical analysis carried out using RSM, which produced the maximum result of 258.750 U/ml at 2.5% sucrose, 10% peptone, and 0% salinity. Applications and improvements: The enzyme created as a result of its effectiveness at operating at an alkaline pH can be used in bioremediation as well as the detergent and textile industries.</p> Gaurav Singh Naveen Srivastava Copyright (c) 2023 Gaurav Singh, Naveen Srivastava https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2023-04-19 2023-04-19 2 2 18 23 10.31033/abjar.2.2.4 An Anatomical Model of Mothering Behavior in Mus Musculus https://abjar.vandanapublications.com/index.php/ojs/article/view/29 <p>The scientific study of animal behaviour is called ethology, and it often focuses on behaviour in its natural environment and<br>sees behaviour as an adaptive quality that has evolved over time. The term "behaviourism" also refers to the scientific and<br>objective study of animal behaviour, typically focusing on trained behavioural responses in a lab setting or measurable<br>responses to stimuli without a focus on evolutionary adaptability. Numerous naturalists have investigated various facets of<br>animal behaviour throughout history. Charles Darwin (1809–1882) and American and German ornithologists from the late<br>19th and early 20th centuries, such as Wallace Craig, Charles O. Whitman, and Oskar Heinroth (1871–1955), laid the<br>foundations for ethology. The work of three biologists who shared the 1973 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine—Dutch<br>biologist Nikolaas Tinbergen (1907–1988), Austrian biologists Konrad Lorenz and Karl von Frisch (1886–1982)—is<br>generally regarded as having launched the current field of ethology in the 1930s.</p> Animesh Mishra Chandrabhan Shukla Copyright (c) 2023 Animesh Mishra, Chandrabhan Shukla https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2023-05-02 2023-05-02 2 2 24 28 10.31033/abjar.2.2.5